The Weekly Round Up: March 19-25

Welcome back to the Weekly Round Up!  This week was actually a pretty good week.  Sure, Trump issued a permit for the Keystone XL, coral reefs are in the shitter essentially globally, and Shell’s doing some real shady shit in Nigeria- but, scientists have reversed some of the signs of ageing in mice, plants can learn from environmental cues, and the dinosaur family tree might get a complete face-lift. So let’s dive in! Continue reading

The Weekly Round Up: October 23-29

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Okay okay, so maybe we missed putting up an article yesterday, but there was nothing we could do.  I was working all day, and then had to watch Brian hit on straight men for an hour and a half.  So, you know, super busy.  Not to fear though, we’re back today with a new article.  We’ve got a week’s worth of news for you all today, so get ready.  This week had tree planting, clear cutting, and ancient life.  There’s a lot to go over, so let’s dive in. Continue reading

The Weekly Round Up: August 21-27

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Welcome back to the Weekly Round Up.  I hope you have all had a good week, and are ready to catch up on all of the environmental news that you might have missed.  This week was actually pretty uplifting, as we’ve got microbead bans, a new record breaking wildlife reserve, and some really cool new CO2 energy research out of the University of Toronto.  So without further ado, let’s dive in! Continue reading

Conservation On The Frontlines: The Sea Shepherd

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Quite often there is a hole when it comes to conservation, called enforcement. In the common story line of conservation there is a bad guy (ex. Fishing vessel, oil tycoon, poachers) breaking laws or damaging the environment, then the conservationist comes in and exposes the injustice and then new rules are put in place to stop the bad guys from doing more harm. But how do we make sure that the bad guys have stopped? In many instances, we don’t. Conservation campaigns, like everything else in the world, cost money… a lot of money, and quite often the funds to enforce environmental laws aren’t available. That’s why many environmental laws and regulations are left to the Honour System. The Sea Shepherd is an organization that fills that void. Continue reading

The Weekly Round Up: November 9-14

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Some weeks, finding interesting earthy-type news to write about can be difficult.  Other weeks it’s all too serious for my liking.  But sometimes, sometimes you hit gold.  This week, I think we hit gold.  Deadly cows, freeing Willy, and new archaeological findings all kinda set this week apart.  We’ve got the smart with the funny, with a dose of weird in this week’s Round Up. Continue reading

Master Imaginers! Jacques Rougerie and His Floating City!

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I firmly believe that if we have to be the change we want to see in the world. I also believe that our imagination is one of the most popular tools humans have to create a sustainable future for Earth. That’s why when I was scrolling through my Facebook feed and saw a picture of a stingray that is meant to house 7000 people (!), I honestly didn’t understand what it was all about at first… I thought some celebrity billionaire had just had too much money and was like “I’ll make the largest yacht possible!” Where in fact the conception of this ship is much, much different. Continue reading

The Weekly Round Up: May 4-8

TGIF!! It’s that time of the week again where we round up some of the biggest environmental articles! So, let’s get to it!

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Researchers at Festo, a German Robotics company, are looking to animals and nature to inspire the next generation of robots. More specifically, these researchers are inspired by ant colonies, butterfly swarms, and chameleon tongues. The ants provide a template for a group of smaller entities networking and communicating with each other while following orders from a higher level, the butterflies inspired a prototype of robots that can move in the air and communicate with one another to avoid collisions, and the chameleon’s sticky tongue, used to capture insects, has been reworked into a prototype robot that can grab small objects! Festo’s goal is to one day allow these robots into a factory setting.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/05/06/tech/mci-bionic-insects/

Continue reading