Let’s Talk About: Moose

http://summeronwinterlane.com/page/31/

click I wish I had a good reason to want to write about moose today.  The reality of the situation is, however, that I just kinda am in the mood for it.  Sorry.  I could say that it’s in preparation for Canada’s 150th birthday in 2017, but honestly it’s just because they’re pretty damn cool, and I want to talk about them.  In case you didn’t know, Moose are from Canada (and parts of Eurasia), are sometimes named Elliot, and are larger than you’d expect a hooved mammal to be.  So if that whets your appetite, get ready, cause I’ve got more where that came from.

http://oceanadesigns.net/wp-json/oembed/1.0/embed?url=http://oceanadesigns.net/envira/bainbrook-brown/ So let’s just talk about numbers at first.  A full grown make moose can weigh anywhere between 545 and 680 kg (1200- 1800 pounds), and can grow to be 6.5 feet tall.  When on land, moose can run up to 55 km/h, but can also swim too if necessary, diving down 5 metres or more for plants to eat.  In the summer they eat between 20- 24 kg (44- 53 pounds ) of food per day, dropping down to 16- 20 kg in the winter (35-44 pounds)- so like, a small child worth of food.  Moose are also the largest member of the deer family, and have a weird neck waddle thing.  That last fact has nothing to do with numbers, I just thought it should be mentioned.

But enough of that, what’s real interesting is just how crazy strong these guys are.  There are countless stories of moose surviving being hit by a car, and when they don’t survive, the car looks like it just got opened by a can opener.  These guys are walls on legs.  Male moose will also fight over females by slamming their antlers into each other.  Just look at a picture of a huge male moose, and you’ll understand how much of a beefcake these animals are.

Also, they make funny noises.  So that’s fun too!

If you want to know more, just check out the links below:

http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/moose/

http://www.torontozoo.com/explorethezoo/AnimalDetails.asp?pg=387

http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/node/3059